An Anthropology of Power and Absence
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How to Cite

Conway-Long, D. (1). An Anthropology of Power and Absence. Al-Raida Journal, 12-22. https://doi.org/10.32380/alrj.v0i0.371

Abstract

In the current state of the world, there can hardly be a more pressing object of analysis than the Middle East.  As the birthplace of Islam as well as Judaism and  Christianity, this area is rife with patriarchal approaches to spirituality. As one of the most dangerous parts of the planet, currently engaged in the second of recent hot wars between the U.S. and so-called terrorists, it is also an area that has until recently been quite low on the priorities for study and analysis.

https://doi.org/10.32380/alrj.v0i0.371
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